Re: secondlifescripters Digest, Vol 20, Issue 25

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Re: secondlifescripters Digest, Vol 20, Issue 25

Ina Centaur
PV=nRT isn't really that nerdy.
for an extra sexy thermodynamics pizazz, try simulating the
Boltzmann's Equations ;-P

On Nov 28, 2007 12:00 PM,
<[hidden email]> wrote:

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> Today's Topics:
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>    1. Physical object mechanics details? (Craig Berry)
>    2. Re: Physical object mechanics details? (Otenth Paderborn)
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> Message: 1
> Date: Tue, 27 Nov 2007 16:23:47 -0800
> From: "Craig Berry" <[hidden email]>
> Subject: Physical object mechanics details?
> To: Scripters <[hidden email]>
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> So I had a fun idea on the way home last night -- I was going to
> simulate the famous PV = nRT gas law in Second Life.  (Yes, I'm a
> geek, why do you ask?)  So I built a hollow almost-transparent
> cylinder, with a disk at the bottom that detected collisions and
> applied a push upward to objects that hit it -- that being the source
> of "heat".  Then I created a few small physical-object balls and
> dropped them into the top of the cylinder.  After a little tuning I
> had them bouncing around in there against the walls and each other.
> It looked very cool.
>
> Finally, I added the piston, a physical-object disk with a diameter
> just less than the inner diameter of the cylinder.  I found that it
> wouldn't drop into the cylinder unless I made its diameter
> considerably less than that of the cylinder, by about 5cm or so.  Once
> I did that, it fell down through the cylinder...and "jammed" half way
> down.  Even when I turned off the "heat" and thus no balls were
> hitting the piston, it wouldn't settle any further than roughly
> halfway down the cylinder. I tried reducing the piston diameter and
> height, but if I reduced either enough to make it drop the rest of the
> way, it also became too small to stay vertically aligned in the
> cylinder, instead coming to rest rotated by 30 degrees or more on the
> bottom plate and balls.
>
> Obviously, there's something about SL physics I don't understand.  Is
> there a good detailed description of how the engine works somewhere?
> I can pretty much understand that the first problem was caused by a
> "boundary zone" to detect collisions slightly outside the object
> boundaries, but the second problem, with the piston sticking halfway
> down the cylinder, is quite puzzling.
>
> --
> Craig Berry - http://www.cine.net/~cberry/
> "So we stumble and we stagger, down the snakes and up the ladder, to
> the tower where the blessed hours chime."
>   - Leonard Cohen, "Closing Time"
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 2
> Date: Tue, 27 Nov 2007 19:38:56 -0500
> From: "Otenth Paderborn" <[hidden email]>
> Subject: Re: Physical object mechanics details?
> To: Scripters <[hidden email]>
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> On Nov 27, 2007 7:23 PM, Craig Berry <[hidden email]> wrote:
>
> > Obviously, there's something about SL physics I don't understand.  Is
> > there a good detailed description of how the engine works somewhere?
> > I can pretty much understand that the first problem was caused by a
> > "boundary zone" to detect collisions slightly outside the object
> > boundaries, but the second problem, with the piston sticking halfway
> > down the cylinder, is quite puzzling.
> >
> >
> Try it with a tube instead of a hollowed cylinder, perhaps?
>
> --
> Otenth Paderborn
> http://otenth.homefries.org
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> End of secondlifescripters Digest, Vol 20, Issue 25
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Re: secondlifescripters Digest, Vol 20, Issue 25

Craig Berry-2
On Nov 28, 2007 1:30 PM, Ina Centaur <[hidden email]> wrote:
> PV=nRT isn't really that nerdy.
> for an extra sexy thermodynamics pizazz, try simulating the
> Boltzmann's Equations ;-P

I think I'll save that until after I can get a piston to fall all the
way down the length of a tube. :)

--
Craig Berry - http://www.cine.net/~cberry/
"So we stumble and we stagger, down the snakes and up the ladder, to
the tower where the blessed hours chime."
  - Leonard Cohen, "Closing Time"
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